Yearly archives of “2005

Cinemas jamming mobile phone signals

Cinemas jamming mobile phone signals

Via Boing Boing – the US’s National Association of Theater Owners wants the FCC’s permission to block mobile reception inside cinemas. To be honest I thought this already happened in some places… maybe I’d mentally linked it to office buildings with Faraday cage wall structures […]

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New Analog Hole Bill

New Analog Hole Bill

Via EFF DeepLinks, the news that a new “Digital Transition Content Security Act” is being proposed in the US – specifically targetting video ADCs (see discussion of the analogue (analog) hole).

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Service discrimination via two-tier internet

Service discrimination via two-tier internet

The spectre of a two-tier internet (see Control & networks) looms closer again, as detailed in this Boston Globe article – Telecoms want their products to travel on a faster Internet (via Furdlog). “The proposal supported by AT&T and BellSouth would allow telecommunications carriers to […]

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Intel Viiv: control through integrated systems

Intel Viiv: control through integrated systems

Via Furdlog: Intel’s new Viiv technology, the basis of a new range of dual-core processor ‘home media centres,’ will, apparently mean that: “PCs would work with televisions and digital recorders and portable devices so people could move their entertainment wherever they wanted.” (LA Times story)

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GPS External Speed Control in Canada

GPS External Speed Control in Canada

Via Slashdot, a CNN story reports that: Canadian auto regulators are testing a system that would enforce speed limits by making it harder to push down the car’s gas pedal once the speed limit is passed… [using] a global positioning satellite device installed in the […]

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Anti-teenager sound weapon in Wales

Anti-teenager sound weapon in Wales

Boing Boing and MAKE note a New York Times story about the Mosquito, a speaker unit produced by Compound Security which produces a high frequency sound (less audible to older people) in order to drive away teenagers hanging around in front of shops.

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Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements

Thanks are due to my MPhil supervisor, Dr David Reiner (University of Cambridge), course director Dr Bill Nuttall (University of Cambridge) and in no particular order, Frank Field (MIT), Steve Portigal (Portigal Consulting), Andreas Bovens (K.U. Leuven, Meiji University), Bill Thompson (BBC), Cory Doctorow (Electronic […]

References

References

Where a source is a personal correspondence or discussion, and thus has not previously been published, this is clearly indicated in the list of references. The views of individuals should be taken as personal opinion and are not intended to reflect the official views of […]

Case study: Optimum Lifetime Products

Case study: Optimum Lifetime Products

Despite consumer frustration when they break, many products are designed and built to last far longer than might be considered ‘environmentally optimum.’ Simply put, if technology in a certain field is advancing at a rate such that newer products use less energy (in manufacture and […]

Some implications of architectures of control

Some implications of architectures of control

How will increased use of architectures of control in the design of products change the way we live? Depending on how pervasive they are, and how feasible the alternatives are, there is the possible emergence of two tiers of technology consumers–those who embrace products with […]

Consumers’ reactions to external control

Consumers’ reactions to external control

Some of the most extreme consumer reactions may be expected to occur where the architectures of control in products explicitly remove control from the user and pass it to an outside party. Perhaps the TiVo logo was inviting this kind of modification (left image from […]

Consumers’ reactions to DRM

Consumers’ reactions to DRM

If consumers are aware that their behaviour is being restricted, and the idea is presented in this way, then negative reactions to technology are likely to arise–to the level of an increasing frustration, perhaps even ‘resistentialism’ [79]. Now that she is a consumer rather than […]